Katsudon

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Katsudon and miso soup
Katsudon by kina3.jpg
Restaurant location

Katsudon (カツ丼) is a popular Japanese food, a bowl of rice topped with a deep-fried pork cutlet, egg, vegetables, and condiments.

The dish takes its name from the Japanese words tonkatsu (for pork cutlet) and donburi (for rice bowl dish)

It has become a modern tradition for Japanese students to eat katsudon the night before taking a major test or school entrance exam. This is because "katsu" is a homophone of the verb 勝つ katsu, meaning "to win" or "to be victorious". It is also a famous gag of Japanese police films: many people think that suspects will speak the truth with tears when they have eaten katsudon and are asked, "Did you ever think about how your mother feels about this?" Even nowadays, the gag of "We must eat katsudon while interrogating" is popular in Japanese films.[1]

Variations[edit]

Variations include sauce katsudon (with tonkatsu sauce or Worcestershire sauce, a various regions such as Fukui, Kōfu, Gunma, Aizuwakamatsu and Komagane), demi katsudon or domi katsudon (with demi-glace and often green peas, a specialty of Okayama), shio-katsudon (with salt, another Okayama variety), shōyu-dare katsudon (with soy sauce, Niigata style), and miso-katsudon (a favorite in Nagoya). Beef (gyū-katsu) and chicken (oyakodon) can substitute for the pork. Katsukarē is a variation with curry sauce instead of the usual egg.[2]

Preparation[edit]

A popular way of preparing the tonkatsu for the katsudon dish is to dip the cutlet in flour, followed by egg, then dipping in panko breadcrumbs, and skillet frying.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2015-02-22. Retrieved 2014-11-14.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link) CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link) - 岡山県警察 採用情報
  2. ^ Lonely Planet (1 February 2014). The World's Best Spicy Food: Where to Find it & How to Make it. Lonely Planet. p. 82. ISBN 978-1-74360-421-2.
  3. ^ Ono, Tadashi; Salat, Harris (2013). Japanese Soul Cooking: Ramen, Tonkatsu, Tempura, and More from the Streets and Kitchens of Tokyo and Beyond. Potter/Ten Speed/Harmony/Rodale. ISBN 9781607743538. Retrieved 20 July 2020.

External links[edit]