Omurice

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A cut-open omurice with ketchup

Omurice or omu-rice (オムライス, Omu-raisu) is an example of yōshoku (a Western-influenced style of Japanese cuisine[1]) consisting of an omelette made with fried rice and thin, fried scrambled eggs, usually topped with ketchup.[2][3] It is a popular dish both commonly cooked at home and often found at western style diners in Japan. Children in particular enjoy omurice. It is often featured in Japan's version of a children's meal, okosama-ranchi (お子様ランチ).[1]

Etymology[edit]

With omu and raisu being derived from the Japanese pronunciation of the English words omelette and rice,[4] the name is an example of gairaigo.

History[edit]

Omurice is said to have originated around the turn of the 20th century[4] at a western-style restaurant in Tokyo's Ginza district called Renga-tei, inspired by chakin-zushi.[5] The dish was brought to Korea and Taiwan, and it is popular cuisine.[6] It is a fixture on gimbap restaurant menus throughout South Korea, where it is rendered as "오므라이스 (omeuraiseu)" in Hangul.[7]

Variations[edit]

The dish typically consists of chikin raisu (chicken rice: rice pan-fried with ketchup and chicken) wrapped in a thin sheet of fried scrambled eggs. The ingredients flavoring the rice vary. Often, the rice is fried with various meats (but typically chicken) and/or vegetables, and can be flavored with beef stock, ketchup, demi-glace, white sauce or simply salt and pepper. Sometimes, rice is replaced with fried noodles (yakisoba) to make omusoba. A variant in Okinawa is omutako, consisting of an omelette over taco rice. Fried hotdog and Spam are also two popular meats to include in the dish.

Similar dishes[edit]

Indonesian version of nasi goreng pattaya in Pekanbaru, Sumatra

A similar dish exists in Southeast Asia, especially in Malaysia, Indonesia and Singapore, and is called nasi goreng pattaya. It is a fried rice dish, covering chicken fried rice in thin fried egg[dubious ] or omelette.

Volga rice is another similar dish.[8]

In popular culture[edit]

A scene in the 1985 comedy film Tampopo shows omurice being made.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Omuraisu (aka omurice or omu rice, Japanese rice omelette)", JustHungry.com.
  2. ^ Nishimoto, Miyoko (June 1992). "Beyond Sushi: Japanese Cooking in the Great Home-Style Tradition", Vegetarian Times, No. 178. ISSN 0164-8497.
  3. ^ Paxton, Norbert (2008). The Rough Guide to Korea, p.249. ISBN 978-1-4053-8420-9.
  4. ^ a b Shimbo, Hiroko (2000). The Japanese Kitchen, p.148. ISBN 1-55832-177-2.
  5. ^ Kishi Asako (March 15, 2002). "NIPPONIA No.20: Omuraisu", Web-Japan.org.
  6. ^ For example, in Korea during Japanese rule. Sohn, Ho-min (2006). Korean language in culture and society, p.59. ISBN 9780824826949).
  7. ^ Gail Jennings (October 2005). "Shokudo - An Unlikely Marriage of Comfort Foods". hawaiidiner.com. Archived from the original on 2010-10-31.)
  8. ^ "Volga Rice - 【郷土料理ものがたり】". kyoudo-ryouri.com. Retrieved Jul 19, 2019.

External links[edit]