EMR1

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Egf-like module containing, mucin-like, hormone receptor-like 1
Identifiers
Symbols EMR1 ; TM7LN3
External IDs OMIM600493 MGI106912 HomoloGene1493 IUPHAR: EMR1 GeneCards: EMR1 Gene
RNA expression pattern
PBB GE EMR1 207111 at tn.png
More reference expression data
Orthologs
Species Human Mouse
Entrez 2015 13733
Ensembl ENSG00000174837 ENSMUSG00000004730
UniProt Q14246 Q61549
RefSeq (mRNA) NM_001256252 NM_010130
RefSeq (protein) NP_001243181 NP_034260
Location (UCSC) Chr 19:
6.89 – 6.94 Mb
Chr 17:
57.36 – 57.48 Mb
PubMed search [1] [2]

EGF-like module-containing mucin-like hormone receptor-like 1 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the EMR1 gene.[1][2][3] The mouse homologue is known as F4/80.[4]

Function[edit]

This gene encodes a protein that is a member of the adhesion-GPCR family. [5] Family members are characterized by an extended extracellular region with a variable number of protein domains coupled to a TM7 region via membrane proximal GAIN domain. In the case of EMR1 these domains are Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF-like) domains.

Emr1 is a transmembrane protein present on the cell-surface of human macrophages, which are derived from the myeloid lineage. It has an approximate mass of 125 kDa, and is associated with mature macrophages.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Baud V, Chissoe SL, Viegas-Pequignot E, Diriong S, N'Guyen VC, Roe BA, Lipinski M (Aug 1995). "EMR1, an unusual member in the family of hormone receptors with seven transmembrane segments". Genomics 26 (2): 334–44. doi:10.1016/0888-7543(95)80218-B. PMID 7601460. 
  2. ^ McKnight AJ, Gordon S (Mar 1998). "The EGF-TM7 family: unusual structures at the leukocyte surface". J Leukoc Biol 63 (3): 271–80. PMID 9500513. 
  3. ^ "Entrez Gene: EMR1 egf-like module containing, mucin-like, hormone receptor-like 1". 
  4. ^ Leenen PJ, de Bruijn MF, Voerman JS, Campbell PA, van Ewijk W (September 1994). "Markers of mouse macrophage development detected by monoclonal antibodies". J. Immunol. Methods 174 (1-2): 5–19. doi:10.1016/0022-1759(94)90005-1. PMID 8083537. 
  5. ^ Yona, Stacey (2011). Adhesion-GPCRs. Springer. pp. 1–200. ISBN 978-1-4419-7912-4. 

Further reading[edit]


This article incorporates text from the United States National Library of Medicine, which is in the public domain.