GPR6

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G protein-coupled receptor 6
Identifiers
Symbol GPR6
External IDs OMIM600553 MGI2155249 HomoloGene38026 IUPHAR: GPR6 GeneCards: GPR6 Gene
RNA expression pattern
PBB GE GPR6 214655 at tn.png
More reference expression data
Orthologs
Species Human Mouse
Entrez 2830 140741
Ensembl ENSG00000146360 ENSMUSG00000046922
UniProt P46095 Q6YNI2
RefSeq (mRNA) NM_005284 NM_199058
RefSeq (protein) NP_005275 NP_951013
Location (UCSC) Chr 6:
110.3 – 110.3 Mb
Chr 10:
41.07 – 41.07 Mb
PubMed search [1] [2]

G protein-coupled receptor 6, also known as GPR6, is a protein which in humans is encoded by the GPR6 gene.[1][2]

Function[edit]

GPR6 is a member of the G protein-coupled receptor family of transmembrane receptors. It has been reported that GPR6 is both constitutively active but in addition is further activated by sphingosine-1-phosphate.[3]

GPR6 up-regulates cyclic AMP levels and promotes neurite outgrowth.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Entrez Gene: GPR6 G protein-coupled receptor 6". 
  2. ^ Song ZH, Modi W, Bonner TI (July 1995). "Molecular cloning and chromosomal localization of human genes encoding three closely related G protein-coupled receptors". Genomics 28 (2): 347–9. doi:10.1006/geno.1995.1154. PMID 8530049. 
  3. ^ Uhlenbrock K, Gassenhuber H, Kostenis E (November 2002). "Sphingosine 1-phosphate is a ligand of the human gpr3, gpr6 and gpr12 family of constitutively active G protein-coupled receptors". Cellular Signalling 14 (11): 941–53. doi:10.1016/S0898-6568(02)00041-4. PMID 12220620. 
  4. ^ Tanaka S, Ishii K, Kasai K, Yoon SO, Saeki Y (April 2007). "Neural expression of G protein-coupled receptors GPR3, GPR6, and GPR12 up-regulates cyclic AMP levels and promotes neurite outgrowth". The Journal of Biological Chemistry 282 (14): 10506–15. doi:10.1074/jbc.M700911200. PMID 17284443. 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]

  • "GPR6". IUPHAR Database of Receptors and Ion Channels. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology.