COVID-19 pandemic in Texas

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COVID-19 pandemic in Texas
COVID-19 Prevalence in Texas by county.svg
Map of the outbreak in Texas by percent infected (as of May 26)
  1.00%+ confirmed infected
  0.50%-1.00% confirmed infected
  0.10%-0.50% confirmed infected
  0.02%-0.10% confirmed infected
  0.00%-0.02% confirmed infected
DiseaseCOVID-19
Virus strainSARS-CoV-2
LocationTexas, U.S
First outbreakWuhan, Hubei, China
Index caseSan Antonio
Arrival dateJanuary 2020
Confirmed cases55,971[1]
Hospitalized cases1,511 (current)
Recovered35,292 (estimate)
Deaths
1,527
Government website
www.dshs.texas.gov/coronavirus/

The COVID-19 pandemic reached the U.S. state of Texas in March 2020. As of May 25, 2020 Texas public health officials have reported 55,971 confirmed COVID-19 cases, an increase of 623 cases (1.1%) over the previous day. Eight new deaths were reported, raising the state's COVID-19 death toll to 1,527.[2]

Timeline[edit]

COVID-19 cases in Texas, United States  ()
     Deaths        Recoveries        Active cases

Mar Mar Apr Apr May May Last 15 days Last 15 days

Date
# of cases
# of deaths
2020-03-06
5 0
2020-03-07
5 0
2020-03-08
5 0
2020-03-09
12(+140%) 0
2020-03-10
15(+25%) 0
2020-03-11
18(+20%) 0
2020-03-12
22(+22.2%) 0
2020-03-13
22 0
2020-03-14
22 0
2020-03-15
56(+155%) 0
2020-03-16
56 0
2020-03-17
63(+12.5%) 1
2020-03-18
82(+30.2%) 2(+100%)
2020-03-19
108(+31.7%) 3(+50%)
2020-03-20
175(+62%) 5(+66.7%)
2020-03-21
235(+34.3%) 5
2020-03-22
263(+11.9%) 5
2020-03-23
287(+9%) 8(+60%)
2020-03-24
712(+148%) 11(+37.5%)
2020-03-25
975(+36.9%) 12(+9%)
2020-03-26
1,396(+43.2%) 18(+50%)
2020-03-27
1,731(+24%) 23(+27.8%)
2020-03-28
2,052(+18.5%) 27(+17.4%)
2020-03-29
2,552(+24.4%) 34(+25.9%)
2020-03-30
2,877(+12.7%) 38(+10.5%)
2020-03-31
3,266(+13.5%) 41(+7.9%)
2020-04-01
3,997(+22.4%) 58(+42.5%)
2020-04-02
4,669(+16.8%) 70(+20.7%)
2020-04-03
5,330(+14.2%) 90(+28.6%)
2020-04-04
6,110(+14.6%) 105(+16.7%)
2020-04-05
6,812(+11.5%) 127(+20.1%)
2020-04-06
7,276(+6.8%) 140(+9.3%)
2020-04-07
8,262(+13.6%) 154(+10%)
2020-04-08
9,353(+13.2%) 177(+14.9%)
2020-04-09
10,230(+9.4%) 199(+12.4%)
2020-04-10
11,671(+14.1%) 226(+13.6%)
2020-04-11
12,561(+7.6%) 254(+12.38%)
2020-04-12
13,484(+7.3%) 271(+6.69%)
2020-04-13
13,906(+3.13%) 287(+5.9%)
2020-04-14
14,624(+5.16%) 318(+10.8%)
2020-04-15
15,492(+5.94%) 364(+14.5%)
2020-04-16
16,455(+6.22%) 393(+7.97%)
2020-04-17
17,371(+5.57%) 428(+8.91%)
2020-04-18
18,260(+5.12%) 453(+5.84%)
2020-04-19
18,923(+3.63%) 477(+5.30%)
2020-04-20
19,458(+2.83%) 495(+3.77%)
2020-04-21
20,196(+3.79%) 517(+4.44%)
2020-04-22
21,069(+4.32%) 543(+5.03%)
2020-04-23
21,944(+4.15%) 561(+3.31%)
2020-04-24
22,806(+3.93%) 593(+5.70%)
2020-04-25
23,773(+4.24%) 623(+5.06%)
2020-04-26
24,631(+3.61%) 648(+4.01%)
2020-04-27
25,297(+2.70%) 663(+2.31%)
2020-04-28
26,171(+3.45%) 690(+4.07%)
2020-04-29
27,054(+3.37%) 732(+6.09%)
2020-04-30
28,087(+3.81%) 782(+6.83%)
2020-05-01
29,229(+4.07%) 816(+4.35%)
2020-05-02
30,522(+4.42%) 847(+3.79%)
2020-05-03
31,548(+3.36%) 867(+2.36%)
2020-05-04
32,332(+2.48%) 884(+1.96%)
2020-05-05
33,369(+3.21%) 906(+2.49%)
2020-05-06
34,422(+3.16%) 948(+4.64%)
2020-05-07
35,390(+2.81%) 973(+2.64%)
2020-05-08
36,609(+3.44%) 1,004(+3.18%)
2020-05-09
37,860(+3.41%) 1,049(+4.48%)
2020-05-10
38,869(+2.67%) 1,088(+3.72%)
2020-05-11
39,869(+2.57%) 1,100(+1.10%)
2020-05-12
41,048(+2.96%) 1,133(+3.00%)
2020-05-13
42,403(+3.30%) 1,158(+2.21%)
2020-05-14
43,851(+3.41%) 1,216(+5.01%)
2020-05-15
45,198(+3.07%) 1,272(+4.61%)
2020-05-16
46,999(+3.98%) 1,305(+2.59%)
2020-05-17
47,784(+1.67%) 1,336(+2.38%)
2020-05-18
48,693(+1.90%) 1,347(+0.8%)
2020-05-19
49,912(+2.50%) 1,369(+1.63%)
2020-05-20
51,323(+2.83%) 1,419(+3.65%)
2020-05-21
52,268(+1.84%) 1,440(+1.48%)
2020-05-22
53,449(+2.25%) 1,480(+2.77%)
2020-05-23
54,509(+1.98%) 1,506(+1.75%)
2020-05-24
55,348(+1.53%) 1,519(+0.86%)
2020-05-25
55,971(+1.12%) 1,527(+0.52%)
2020-05-26
56,560(+1.05%) 1,536(+0.58%)
Cases: The number of cumulative cases in Texas.

Sources:"Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)". Texas Department of State Health Services.,

"Texas Case Counts | COVID-19". Texas Department of State Health Services.

March[edit]

Houston outbreak[edit]

Empty shelves from panic buying at the Sams Club in Lufkin, Texas, on March 13, 2020.

March 4: Public health officials in Fort Bend County, a suburb of Houston, reported a presumptive positive test result in a man in his 70s who had returned in late February from travel to Egypt. The man was hospitalized in stable condition. The new case was the first in Texas outside of US nationals evacuated from Hubei Province and the Diamond Princess cruise ship to Joint Base San Antonio in January 2020.[3][4]

March 5: Public health officials in Houston reported four confirmed cases in two men and two women from Harris County. Both cases are related to the same recent travel group to Egypt.[5] One woman is a staff member at Rice University.[6]

March 6: Three new cases were reported in the Houston area, one in Houston and two in Fort Bend County. All cases were part of a group that had traveled together to Egypt. This brought the Texas cases to eight, all in the Houston region.[7][8]

Dallas outbreak[edit]

On March 9, the Dallas suburb of Collin County reported 3 new presumptive cases.[9] The patients were a married couple and their 3-year-old child who attended Frisco ISD. The man tested positive for the virus after visiting Silicon Valley in late February.[10] The following day, Dallas County and Tarrant County both announced one presumptive case in each county, respectively, with both patients having recently traveled domestically out of state.[11]

Community spread[edit]

On March 11, Houston mayor Sylvester Turner announced cancellation of the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo after declaring the outbreak as a public health emergency.[12] The first possible case of community spread in the Houston area was announced the same day, in a patient who had not traveled out of the state.[13] Lakewood Church in Houston, one of the nation's biggest mega-churches announced it was canceling in-person services till further notice.[14] On March 12, Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins announced five additional positive cases with one of the cases being the first instance of community spread in the North Texas area.[15] A day later, the cities of Austin, San Antonio, and Tyler, as well as Bell and Galveston counties, announced confirmed cases. San Antonio also announced a ban of gatherings of 500 or more.[16]

March 13: University of Texas president Gregory L. Fenves announced that his wife Carmel had contracted Coronavirus after a trip to New York City. In an open letter to UT staff, faculty, and students, Fenves stated his wife began exhibiting flu-like symptoms after their trip, during which they attended several events with alumni and students, and was tested positive for COVID-19. Both Fenves, his wife, and an additional family member are in self-isolation, and the president has advised community members to follow CDC preventive measures against the spread of the virus.[17] The first case of COVID-19 was also reported and confirmed in El Paso.[18]

March 16: Matagorda County officials announced the second positive case of coronavirus in Matagorda County. The patient, a man in his late 90s, died Sunday evening at Matagorda Regional Medical Center with symptoms consistent with COVID-19.[19]

The second death in Texas has been reported on March 17, of a resident of a retirement community in Arlington who died on Sunday, March 15.[20]

March 17: The third death in Texas has been reported on March 18, of a resident in Plano who died in a local hospital on March 17.[21]

March 26: Bell County, Texas announced its first death, a woman.[22]

April[edit]

April 1: 44 college students from the University of Texas at Austin tested positive for coronavirus. They are part of a group of 70 college students who had chartered a flight for spring break in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico. Some of the students took commercial flights back home to the US, causing health and other officials to have to try to track down who else may have been infected, via contact tracing.[23][24]

April 3: Sixty residents and nine staff members at a San Antonio nursing home have been infected with COVID-19. One person has died. Nationally, there have been 450 nursing home deaths.[25]

April 17: Governor Abbott issued Executive Order GA-17, establishing the Governor's Strike Force to Open Texas, for advisement from political and medical leaders on "safely and strategically restarting and revitalizing all aspects of the Lone Star State". That process began with revised social distancing protocols that now allowed delivery and pick-up services starting the 24th, under Abbott's previous executive order, GA-16, also issued on the 17th. Also on this day, Governor Abbott ordered the closure of all public and private schools for the remainder of the 2019-2020 academic year, including all institutions of higher education. [26]

April 27: On April 26 Moore County had become the first in Texas with more than 1/100 of population infected. Of all infections added in Texas on that day, 1/14 came from this county having 1/1400 part of Texas population. On April 27 the infection rate for Moore county became 1.3%, this is 15 times higher than the average value detected for Texas.[27] Governor Abbott announced the first of three phases in a plan to open Texas up from the lockdown, allowing restaurants, retail businesses, museums, and other locations to open up at 25% occupant capacity starting May 1st, albeit under new minimum standard health protocols.[28] The Governor's Office also released The Governor's Report to Open Texas, outlining the three-phase plan to end the lockdown and giving guidance on the newly released social protocols from the Governor and chief officers of the Strike Force.[29]

May[edit]

May 1: After a decline in the infection expansion about 10 days ago, the number of new detected infections exceeded 1,000 on April 30 for the first time after April 10, and became higher on May 1. The registered number of "active" infections exceeded 14,000. A new highest number of daily covid-related death, 50, was recorded on April 30.[30]

May 8: The total number of recorded covid-related death exceeded 1,000. The registered number of active infections became higher than 16,000.

May 13: Potter county became the first large (>100,000 population) county with recorded infection rate >1% (actually became >1.1% because of fast increasing), while adjacent smaller Moore county is approaching 3%. Recorded average covid-related death rate in Texas is still low at about 1/25,000 of total population, but some smaller counties (as the mentioned Moore and especially Washington) already demonstrate statistically meaningful rates being higher by a factor of ten or more (https://dshs.texas.gov/coronavirus/)

May 15: New highest daily numbers for new infections (after previous highest on April 10) and covid-related death cases (after previous highest on April 30) were recorded. The registered number of currently active infections became higher than 18000 (https://dshs.texas.gov/coronavirus/). This represents a new increase in infection growth and an increase in probability of infection for more people coming in contact with infected persons.

May 16: Largest single day jump in new cases (1,801 new cases). The Amarillo area (Potter and Randall counties) recorded 734 new cases due to targeted testing of employees at meat plants in the area. Gov. Abbot previously ordered a Surge Response Team (SRT) to Amarillo to begin testing in high risk areas (such as meat packing facilities). [31][32].

Government response[edit]

On March 2, San Antonio Mayor Ron Nirenberg and Bexar County both declared a "local state of disaster and a public health emergency" after an individual was mistakenly released from quarantine at Joint Base San Antonio by the CDC before a third test for coronavirus returned a positive result.[33] The city subsequently petitioned the US government to extend the quarantine of US nationals at Joint Base San Antonio; the petition was denied by Judge Xavier Rodriguez in the United States District Court for the Western District of Texas.[34][35] Both the city of Dallas and Dallas County have declared a "local disaster of public health emergency".[36]

On March 13, Governor Greg Abbott declared a statewide disaster for all counties in the state. He also announced the first drive-through testing facility in San Antonio, and will expand to other cities across the state.[37][38][39]

On March 22, Governor Abbott directed health care professionals to postpone surgeries that are not "medically necessary", as well as suspend regulations to allow hospitals to have more than one patient in a room.[40] Controversially, Attorney General Ken Paxton later indicated that this included abortions (except for the life or health of the mother).[41] Abbott also stated that there would not be any statewide stay-at-home order anytime soon, due to the fact that more than 200 counties did not have any cases.[40][42]

Abbott left the decision to the local government to set stricter guidelines. Two hours later, Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins ordered residents of Dallas County to shelter in place beginning 11:59 p.m. on the following day.[43] A day later on March 23, Bell,[44] Bexar,[45] Brazos,[46] Cameron,[47] Hunt,[48] McLennan,[49] Stephens[50] counties and the city of Forney,[51] issued a shelter in place for their communities. Collin,[52] Galveston,[53] Harris,[54] Travis[45][55] and Williamson[55] counties issued same measures on March 24. However, Collin County had more relaxed guidelines for their shelter in place order. Collin County's order stated that all businesses are essential and would be allowed to remain open as long as they followed physical distancing guidelines.[56]

On March 30, Governor Abbott issued a state-wide executive order, instructing residents to minimize any gatherings or in-person contact with people who are not part of the same household, and remain home unless conducting essential activities and services. Abbott did not specifically use the term "stay-at-home order" or "shelter-in-place" to describe the order, arguing that they were either misnomers (shelter-in-place usually referring to emergency situations) or did not adequately reflect the goal of the order. The order exempts places of worship as essential services (subject to social distancing), but Abbott still recommended that remote services be conducted instead.[57]

The abortion ban (which does not apply to "medically necessary" procedures) was challenged in court and rapidly appealed. By April 10, a three-judge panel of the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed the ban, but with an exception for pregnancies approaching the point where an abortion cannot be postponed because it would soon no longer be allowed.[58]

On April 17, Abbott announced that beginning April 24, hospitals would be allowed to perform a limited number of elective surgeries, retail outlets would be allowed to resume service to offer curbside pickup directly to shoppers' vehicles for phone-based and online orders ("retail to go"), and state parks would be allowed to re-open beginning April 19 (although visitors are required to wear face masks and maintain social distancing).[59]

On May 20, 2020, on the heels of several anti-lockdown protests at state capitals,[60] [61]anti-vaxxers opposed to vaccinations descend in MAGA hats on the Texas state capital in Austin[62] to echo Plandemic's anti-vaccination theme and demand a lifting of state orders closing businesses. Promoted on facebook, the event page for the Texas protest titled "You Can't Close America" says the purpose of the rally is to "show the globalists, including eugenicist Bill Gates, the World Health Organization and the CDC, that they can’t suspend freedom in America at a mere whim, and that they can’t force us to wear face masks like the people in Communist China." The rally features signs that condemn COVID-19 shelter in place and business lockdown orders as "tyranny." One woman holds up an American flag and a poster featuring a crossed-out surgical mask, with the words underneath "My body, my choice, Trump 2020" in a reference to the pro-choice abortion rights movement. In response, Paul Offit, the director the Vaccine Education Center at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, tells a reporter, “When you’re exposed to someone who is unvaccinated, that takes away your personal freedom.You’re infringing on other people’s choice when you forego forego vaccination."

Fox News defends Gates, noting he has contributed more than $100 million to COVID-19 relief efforts.[63]

Economic impact[edit]

Sixth Street in Austin after all bars and restaurants were ordered closed

On March 13, Six Flags (based in Texas) suspended operations to all their properties (12) nationwide as well as in Mexico, that were operating in the month of March, until the end of the month; these include the two Texas parks, Six Flags Fiesta Texas and Six Flags Over Texas. On March 30, the closure was extended to all their properties until mid-May.[64] Sea World San Antonio announced plans to close from March 16 to April 1, along with all Schlitterbahn waterparks,[65] the parks have delayed the closure as well until mid-May.

On March 14, H-E-B announced that all of their stores across the state will reduce open hours, to help restock items. This also includes their pharmacies and Central Market locations.[66] The announcement comes a day after the company announced that its Houston area stores would be the only locations to implement changes to their operations.[67] A month later, H-E-B expanded their store hours across the state (closer to normal store hours), as supply availability has improved.[68][69]

Event cancellations[edit]

For the first time in the event's history, South by Southwest was cancelled as a result of local health concerns about the coronavirus pandemic.[70][71] The Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo cancelled the rest of the event on March 11, that was slated to run until March 22. It was confirmed that a resident from Montgomery County, Texas that was tested positive, attended the BBQ cook off at the rodeo on February 28.[72] The attendance for the rodeo on February 28, was 77,632, with 73,433 of the visitors went to the "World Championship Barb-B-Que Contest," where that person attended.[73] The FIRST Robotics World Championship, slated to occur in Houston around mid-April, was canceled due to the Coronavirus, along with all the other FIRST Robotics Competitions in Texas. The Championship is one of the world's largest gatherings in competitive robotics.[74]

After the announcement of the ban of gatherings of over 500 people on March 13 (in San Antonio), Fiesta San Antonio postponed their event to November 2020, that was originally slated for mid-April.[75]

Schools[edit]

Digital homework assigned in a Texas public school

Houston Independent School District, the state's largest school district, is among dozens of school districts extending their spring break, to help prevent the spread of the coronavirus.[76][77] The closures are not without precedent, as many schools closed for two weeks during the 2009 H1N1 flu when Houston experienced a major outbreak.[76] Among the closures of school districts and universities across the state, Governor Greg Abbott on March 16, waived all State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) testing for the 2019–20 school year for public grade schools.[78]

On March 19, Governor Abbott issued an executive order that closed schools statewide until at least April 3.[79] On March 31, the Governor announced that schools in the state will continue to stay closed until May 4.[80] On April 17, Greg Abbott said that Texas public schools would be closed for the remainder of the 2019–20 school year and that schools will continue to offer distance learning.[81]

Impact on sports[edit]

Globe Life Park in Arlington, Texas, on March 7, 2020

Most of the state's sports teams were affected. Several leagues began postponing or suspending their seasons starting March 12. Major League Baseball cancelled the remainder of spring training on that date, and on March 16, they announced that the season will be postponed indefinitely, after the recommendations from the CDC to restrict events of more than 50 people for the next eight weeks, affecting the Texas Rangers and Houston Astros.[82] Also on March 12, the National Basketball Association announced the season would be suspended for 30 days, affecting the Dallas Mavericks, Houston Rockets and San Antonio Spurs.[83] In the National Hockey League, the season was suspended for an indefinite amount of time, affecting the Dallas Stars.[84] In Major League Soccer the Houston Dynamo and FC Dallas also had their season suspended, starting March 12.[85]

In college sports, the National Collegiate Athletic Association cancelled all winter and spring tournaments, most notably the Division I men's and women's basketball tournaments, affecting colleges and universities statewide.[86] On March 16, the National Junior College Athletic Association also canceled the remainder of the winter seasons as well as the spring seasons.[87]

Statistics[edit]

County [a] Cases [b] Deaths Recoveries Pop (2020) cases/100k Ref.
225 / 254 52,268 1,440 31,223 [c] 28,304,756 184.66
Anderson 63 0 32 57,741 109.11
Andrews 22 0 21 17,722 124.14
Angelina 168 2 54 87,805 191.33
Aransas 5 0 2 25,572 19.55
Archer 1 0 0 8,809 11.35
Armstrong 2 0 2 1,879 106.44
Atascosa 35 1 18 48,981 71.46
Austin 21 0 14 29,786 70.50
Bailey 10 0 2 7,077 141.30
Bandera 6 0 6 22,351 26.84
Bastrop 161 2 44 84,761 189.95
Baylor 0 0 0 3,581 0.00
Bee 8 0 6 32,563 24.57
Bell 282 3 150 347,833 81.07
Bexar 2,392 63 1,164 1,958,578 118.56 [88]
Blanco 7 0 6 11,626 60.21
Borden 0 0 0 673 0.00
Bosque 6 0 2 18,326 32.74
Bowie 176 5 70 94,012 187.21
Brazoria 805 11 407 362,457 222.10 [89]
Brazos 362 18 165 222,830 162.46 [90]
Brewster 1 0 1 9,337 10.71
Briscoe 1 0 1 1,528 65.45
Brooks 1 0 1 7,235 13.82
Brown 55 7 30 38,053 144.54
Burleson 20 0 3 18,011 111.04
Burnet 29 0 14 46,804 61.96
Caldwell 41 0 7 42,338 96.84
Calhoun 37 3 29 21,744 170.16
Callahan 8 1 2 13,946 57.36
Cameron 664 32 418 423,725 156.71 [91]
Camp 32 0 7 12,855 248.93
Carson 6 0 3 6,032 99.47
Cass 21 0 16 30,012 69.97
Castro 29 1 17 7,843 369.76
Chambers 58 0 47 41,441 139.96 [92]
Cherokee 44 2 17 52,240 84.23
Childress 2 0 1 7,067 28.30
Clay 3 0 3 10,421 28.79
Cochran 1 0 1 2,851 35.08
Coke 1 0 1 3,306 30.25
Coleman 2 0 1 8,430 23.72
Collin 1,090 31 740 969,603 112.42 [93]
Collingsworth 4 0 1 2,987 133.91
Colorado 19 0 11 21,232 89.49
Comal 78 6 56 141,009 55.32 [94]
Comanche 5 1 2 13,573 36.84 [95]
Concho 1 0 1 2,717 36.81
Cooke 13 0 9 39,895 32.59
Coryell 226 2 28 74,913 301.68
Cottle 4 1 2 1,387 288.39 [96]
Crane 3 0 2 4,740 63.29
Crockett 0 0 0 3,564 0.00
Crosby 3 1 1 5,899 50.86
Culberson 0 0 0 2,231 0.00
Dallam 18 0 9 7,208 249.72 [97]
Dallas 7,904 191 4,029 2,618,148 301.89 [98]
Dawson 39 1 25 12,813 304.38
Deaf Smith 141 7 35 18,836 748.57
Delta 1 0 1 5,298 18.88
Denton 1,161 28 592 836,210 138.84 [99]
DeWitt 17 1 14 20,226 84.05 [100]
Dickens 1 0 1 2,209 45.27
Dimmit 1 0 1 10,418 9.60
Donley 26 0 25 3,311 785.26 [101]
Duval 5 0 3 11,273 44.35
Eastland 5 0 3 18,411 27.16
Ector 130 4 81 157,087 82.76 [102]
Edwards 0 0 0 1,953 0.00
El Paso 2,046 57 1,106 840,410 243.45 [103]
Ellis 266 12 156 173,620 153.21 [104]
Erath 15 1 12 41,969 35.74
Falls 6 0 2 17,437 34.41
Fannin 29 2 18 34,446 84.19 [105]
Fayette 31 2 10 25,272 122.67
Fisher 2 0 0 3,880 51.55
Floyd 5 0 4 5,855 85.40
Foard 0 0 0 1,222 0.00
Fort Bend 1,621 40 433 764,828 211.94 [106]
Franklin 8 0 3 10,767 74.30
Freestone 7 0 2 19,625 35.67
Frio 35 0 8 19,600 178.57 [107]
Gaines 6 0 3 20,638 29.07
Galveston 721 31 446 335,036 215.20 [108]
Garza 4 0 2 6,528 61.27
Gillespie 5 0 3 26,646 18.76
Glasscock 1 0 1 1,348 74.18
Goliad 7 0 7 7,562 92.57
Gonzales 90 2 24 20,893 430.77 [109]
Gray 95 1 60 22,404 424.03 [110]
Grayson 268 1 76 131,140 204.36 [111]
Gregg 180 4 96 123,367 145.91 [112]
Grimes 91 1 11 28,032 324.63 [113]
Guadalupe 116 0 81 159,659 72.65 [114]
Hale 50 4 34 34,134 146.48
Hall 1 0 0 3,071 32.56
Hamilton 7 0 4 8,422 83.12
Hansford 18 2 7 5,477 328.65 [115]
Hardeman 0 0 0 3,994 0.00
Hardin 121 4 100 57,139 211.76 [116]
Harris 10,095 210 3,914 4,652,980 216.96 [117]
Harrison 217 22 131 66,661 325.53
Hartley 11 2 4 5,691 193.29 [118]
Haskell 2 0 0 5,746 34.81
Hays 250 3 155 214,485 116.56 [119]
Hemphill 1 0 1 4,024 24.85
Henderson 51 0 29 81,064 62.91
Hidalgo 467 10 264 860,661 54.26 [120]
Hill 23 1 11 35,852 64.15
Hockley 27 1 18 23,088 116.94
Hood 23 3 15 58,273 39.74 [121]
Hopkins 12 0 6 36,496 32.88
Houston 81 0 7 23,021 351.85
Howard 6 1 4 36,040 16.65
Hudspeth 0 0 0 4,408 0.00
Hunt 71 3 45 93,872 75.63 [122]
Hutchinson 31 0 17 21,375 145.03
Irion 0 0 0 1,516 0.00
Jack 4 0 4 8,832 45.29
Jackson 16 1 12 14,805 108.07
Jasper 26 1 15 35,561 73.11 [123]
Jeff Davis 0 0 0 2,280 0.00
Jefferson 465 27 281 256,299 181.43 [124]
Jim Hogg 4 0 2 5,202 76.89
Jim Wells 9 0 4 40,871 22.02
Johnson 144 4 80 167,301 86.07 [125]
Jones 134 0 68 19,983 670.57
Karnes 4 0 3 15,187 26.34
Kaufman 173 2 88 122,883 140.78 [126]
Kendall 24 0 16 44,026 54.51
Kenedy 0 0 0 417 0.00
Kent 0 0 0 763 0.00
Kerr 11 0 6 51,720 21.27
Kimble 1 0 0 4,410 22.68
King 0 0 0 296 0.00
Kinney 0 0 0 3,745 0.00
Kleberg 14 1 8 31,088 45.03
Knox 1 0 1 3,710 26.95
La Salle 4 0 1 7,584 52.74
Lamar 126 9 58 49,587 254.10 [127]
Lamb 11 0 4 13,210 83.27
Lampasas 8 0 1 21,207 37.72
Lavaca 8 1 5 20,062 39.88
Lee 8 0 3 17,183 46.56
Leon 9 0 3 17,243 52.20
Liberty 81 3 43 83,658 96.82
Limestone 18 1 8 23,527 76.51
Lipscomb 2 0 2 3,378 59.21
Live Oak 9 0 5 12,174 73.93
Llano 3 0 3 21,210 14.14
Loving 0 0 0 134 0.00
Lubbock 639 50 415 305,225 209.35 [128]
Lynn 5 1 4 5,859 85.34
Madison 8 0 2 14,222 56.25
Marion 15 0 13 10,064 149.05
Martin 3 1 2 5,626 53.32 [129]
Mason 31 0 22 4,222 734.25
Matagorda 63 5 57 36,840 171.01 [130]
Maverick 94 1 23 58,216 161.47
McCulloch 3 0 3 7,957 37.70
McLennan 102 4 90 251,259 40.60
McMullen 0 0 0 778 0.00
Medina 64 2 17 50,066 127.83
Menard 0 0 0 2,124 0.00
Midland 123 12 43 165,049 74.52 [131]
Milam 27 1 19 25,053 107.77
Mills 1 0 0 4,921 20.32
Mitchell 1 0 1 8,468 11.81
Montague 9 1 7 19,539 46.06
Montgomery 861 21 331 570,934 150.81 [132]
Moore 579 13 373 22,097 2,620.27 [133]
Morris 15 0 8 12,467 120.32
Motley 1 0 1 1,230 81.30
Nacogdoches 244 17 162 65,580 372.06 [134]
Navarro 40 2 28 48,701 82.13
Newton 4 0 4 13,952 28.67 [135]
Nolan 2 0 2 14,770 13.54
Nueces 256 3 127 361,221 70.87
Ochiltree 41 3 20 10,073 407.03
Oldham 3 1 2 2,114 141.91
Orange 89 2 71 85,047 104.65 [136]
Palo Pinto 10 2 7 28,570 35.00 [137]
Panola 164 19 114 23,243 705.59 [138]
Parker 67 1 37 133,463 50.20
Parmer 39 0 11 9.842 396.26
Pecos 24 0 12 15,634 153.51
Polk 52 0 19 49,162 105.77
Potter 2,196 24 358 120,458 1,823.04 [139]
Presidio 0 0 0 7,156 0.00
Rains 3 0 2 11,762 25.51
Randall 625 5 150 134,442 464.88
Reagan 0 0 0 3,710 0.00
Real 0 0 0 3,429 0.00
Red River 42 4 1 12,229 343.45
Reeves 5 0 0 15,281 32.72
Refugio 3 0 1 7,224 41.53
Roberts 2 0 2 938 213.22
Robertson 7 0 2 17,203 40.69
Rockwall 147 9 80 96,788 151.88 [140]
Runnels 2 0 2 10,266 19.48
Rusk 42 2 36 52,833 79.50
Sabine 4 0 1 10,461 38.24
San Augustine 28 1 14 8,253 339.27
San Jacinto 13 0 10 28,270 45.99
San Patricio 28 0 19 67,215 41.66
San Saba 1 0 0 5,959 16.78
Schleicher 0 0 0 3,001 0.00
Scurry 2 0 2 17,050 11.73
Shackelford 1 0 0 3,328 30.05
Shelby 180 5 114 25,513 705.52 [141]
Sherman 23 0 16 3,067 749.92
Smith 195 4 145 227,727 85.63
Somervell 0 0 0 8,845 0.00
Starr 22 0 9 64,454 34.13
Stephens 2 0 1 9,337 21.42
Sterling 0 0 0 1,295 0.00
Stonewall 0 0 0 1,388 0.00
Sutton 0 0 0 3,767 0.00
Swisher 15 0 10 7,515 199.60
Tarrant 4,711 132 1,716 2,054,475 229.30 [142]
Taylor 224 5 179 136,290 164.36 [143]
Terrell 0 0 0 810 0.0
Terry 13 0 12 12,715 102.24
Throckmorton 0 0 0 1,527 0.00
Titus 189 2 20 32,904 574.40
Tom Green 63 1 52 118,019 53.38
Travis 2,644 82 925 1,226,698 215.54 [144]
Trinity 11 0 9 14,667 75.00
Tyler 10 0 7 21,539 46.43
Upshur 18 0 15 41,281 43.60
Upton 0 0 0 3,663 0.00
Uvalde 6 0 6 27,132 22.11
Val Verde 13 0 13 49,205 26.42
Van Zandt 25 1 16 55,182 45.30
Victoria 157 7 130 92,084 170.50 [145]
Walker 430 27 254 72,245 595.20 [146]
Waller 45 0 33 51,307 87.71
Ward 0 0 0 11,472 0.00
Washington 187 22 41 35,043 533.63 [147]
Webb 498 18 301 274,794 181.23 [148]
Wharton 45 0 39 41,968 107.22
Wheeler 15 0 10 5,358 279.96
Wichita 82 2 61 132,000 62.12
Wilbarger 6 0 2 12,764 47.01
Willacy 15 1 11 21,584 69.50
Williamson 513 20 280 547,545 93.69 [149]
Wilson 38 5 28 49,304 77.07 [150]
Winkler 3 0 3 7,574 39.61
Wise 42 2 22 66,181 63.46
Wood 22 1 10 44,314 49.65
Yoakum 3 0 2 8,568 35.01
Young 4 1 3 17,979 22.25
Zapata 8 0 7 14,322 55.86
Zavala 11 0 1 11,948 92.07
Updated May 21, 2020
Data is publicly reported by Texas Department of State Health Services[151][152][153]
  1. ^ County where individuals with a positive case diagnosed, not where they were reside. Location of original infection may vary.
  2. ^ Reported cases includes presumptive and confirmed case. Actual case numbers are probably higher.
  3. ^ "–" denotes that no data is currently available, not necessarily that the value is zero.

Completed case investigations[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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External links[edit]