T-cell surface glycoprotein CD3 epsilon chain

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from CD3E)
Jump to: navigation, search
CD3e molecule, epsilon (CD3-TCR complex)
Protein CD3E PDB 1xiw.png
PDB rendering based on 1xiw.
Available structures
PDB Ortholog search: PDBe, RCSB
Identifiers
Symbols CD3E ; IMD18; T3E; TCRE
External IDs OMIM186830 MGI88332 HomoloGene586 ChEMBL: 1975 GeneCards: CD3E Gene
RNA expression pattern
PBB GE CD3E 205456 at tn.png
More reference expression data
Orthologs
Species Human Mouse
Entrez 916 12501
Ensembl ENSG00000198851 ENSMUSG00000032093
UniProt P07766 P22646
RefSeq (mRNA) NM_000733 NM_007648
RefSeq (protein) NP_000724 NP_031674
Location (UCSC) Chr 11:
118.18 – 118.19 Mb
Chr 9:
45 – 45.01 Mb
PubMed search [1] [2]

CD3e molecule, epsilon also known as CD3E is a polypeptide which in humans is encoded by the CD3E gene which resides on chromosome 11.[1][2]

Function[edit]

The protein encoded by this gene is the CD3-epsilon polypeptide, which together with CD3-gamma, -delta and -zeta, and the T-cell receptor alpha/beta and gamma/delta heterodimers, forms the T cell receptor-CD3 complex. This complex plays an important role in coupling antigen recognition to several intracellular signal-transduction pathways. The genes encoding the epsilon, gamma and delta polypeptides are located in the same cluster on chromosome 11. The epsilon polypeptide plays an essential role in T-cell development.[3]

Clinical significance[edit]

Defects in this gene cause severe immunodeficiency.[4][5] This gene has also been linked to a susceptibility to type I diabetes in women.[6]

Interactions[edit]

T-cell surface glycoprotein CD3 epsilon chain has been shown to interact with TOP2B,[7] CD3EAP[8] and NCK2.[9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gold DP, Puck JM, Pettey CL, Cho M, Coligan J, Woody JN, Terhorst C (1986). "Isolation of cDNA clones encoding the 20K non-glycosylated polypeptide chain of the human T-cell receptor/T3 complex". Nature 321 (6068): 431–4. doi:10.1038/321431a0. PMID 3012357. 
  2. ^ Clevers HC, Dunlap S, Wileman TE, Terhorst C (November 1988). "Human CD3-epsilon gene contains three miniexons and is transcribed from a non-TATA promoter". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 85 (21): 8156–60. doi:10.1073/pnas.85.21.8156. PMC 282386. PMID 3267235. 
  3. ^ "Entrez Gene: CD3E CD3e molecule, epsilon (CD3-TCR complex)". 
  4. ^ Soudais C, de Villartay JP, Le Deist F, Fischer A, Lisowska-Grospierre B (January 1993). "Independent mutations of the human CD3-epsilon gene resulting in a T cell receptor/CD3 complex immunodeficiency". Nat. Genet. 3 (1): 77–81. doi:10.1038/ng0193-77. PMID 8490660. 
  5. ^ de Saint Basile G, Geissmann F, Flori E, Uring-Lambert B, Soudais C, Cavazzana-Calvo M, Durandy A, Jabado N, Fischer A, Le Deist F (November 2004). "Severe combined immunodeficiency caused by deficiency in either the delta or the epsilon subunit of CD3". J. Clin. Invest. 114 (10): 1512–7. doi:10.1172/JCI22588. PMC 525745. PMID 15546002. 
  6. ^ Wong S, Moore S, Orisio S, Millward A, Demaine AG (January 1991). "Susceptibility to type I diabetes in women is associated with the CD3 epsilon locus on chromosome 11". Clin. Exp. Immunol. 83 (1): 69–73. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2249.1991.tb05590.x. PMC 1535466. PMID 1671006. 
  7. ^ Nakano, H; Yamazaki T; Miyatake S; Nozaki N; Kikuchi A; Saito T (Mar 1996). "Specific interaction of topoisomerase II beta and the CD3 epsilon chain of the T cell receptor complex". J. Biol. Chem. (UNITED STATES) 271 (11): 6483–9. doi:10.1074/jbc.271.11.6483. ISSN 0021-9258. PMID 8626450. 
  8. ^ Yamazaki, T; Hamano Y; Tashiro H; Itoh K; Nakano H; Miyatake S; Saito T (Jun 1999). "CAST, a novel CD3epsilon-binding protein transducing activation signal for interleukin-2 production in T cells". J. Biol. Chem. (UNITED STATES) 274 (26): 18173–80. doi:10.1074/jbc.274.26.18173. ISSN 0021-9258. PMID 10373416. 
  9. ^ Gil, Diana; Schamel Wolfgang W A, Montoya María, Sánchez-Madrid Francisco, Alarcón Balbino (Jun 2002). "Recruitment of Nck by CD3 epsilon reveals a ligand-induced conformational change essential for T cell receptor signaling and synapse formation". Cell (United States) 109 (7): 901–12. doi:10.1016/S0092-8674(02)00799-7. ISSN 0092-8674. PMID 12110186. 


Further reading[edit]

This article incorporates text from the United States National Library of Medicine, which is in the public domain.