CD16

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Fc fragment of IgG, low affinity IIIa, receptor (CD16a)
Identifiers
Symbol FCGR3A
Alt. symbols FCGR3, FCG3
Entrez 2214
HUGO 3619
OMIM 146740
RefSeq NM_000569
UniProt P08637
Other data
Locus Chr. 1 q23
Fc fragment of IgG, low affinity IIIb, receptor (CD16b)
Identifiers
Symbol FCGR3B
Alt. symbols FCGR3, FCG3
Entrez 2215
HUGO 3620
OMIM 610665
RefSeq NM_000570
UniProt O75015
Other data
Locus Chr. 1 q23

CD16 is a low affinity Fc receptor.

It is a cluster of differentiation molecule found on the surface of natural killer cells, neutrophil polymorphonuclear leukocytes, monocytes and macrophages.[1] It can be used to isolate populations of these cells by antibodies directed towards CD16, utilising FACS (fluorescent-activated cell sorting) or MACS (magnetic-activated cell sorting).

Function[edit]

CD16 has been identified as Fc receptors FcγRIIIa (CD16a) and FcγRIIIb (CD16b). These receptors bind to the Fc portion of IgG antibodies which then activates the NK cell for Antibody-Dependent Cell-mediated Cytotoxicity (ADCC). A lack of CD16 in a given population of neutrophils may indicate prematurity, as could be caused by a left-shift due to neutrophilic leukocytosis induced by tissue necrosis or bacterial infection.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Janeway, Charles (2001). "Appendix II. CD antigens". Immunobiology (5 ed.). New York: Garland. ISBN 0-8153-3642-X. 

External links[edit]