Visa policy of New Zealand

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New Zealand entry stamp - general entry
New Zealand entry stamp - visitor visa
New Zealand entry stamp - resident visa

A foreign national wishing to enter New Zealand must obtain a visa unless he or she is

  • a citizen or permanent resident of Australia, under the Trans-Tasman Travel Arrangement,
  • a citizen of one of the 61 visa waiver eligible countries and territories,
  • a holder of the United Nations laissez-passer, or
  • eligible for visa-free travel under other provisions (visiting force, cruise ship passengers and crew, aircraft crew etc.).

Citizens and permanent residents of Australia are deemed to hold resident status in New Zealand upon arrival under Trans-Tasman travel arrangement.

All visitors must hold a passport valid for 1 month. Visitors are required to hold proof of sufficient funds to cover their stay. The amount of funds needed is NZD 1,000 per person per month of stay or NZD 400 if accommodation has been prepaid. Visitors are required to hold documents required for their next destination.[1]

New Zealand issues eVisas to nationals of visa waiver countries and China. Applications for student, work, and visitor visas can be lodged online.[2]

Visa policy map[edit]

Holders of passports of these countries may travel to New Zealand without obtaining a visa
  New Zealand
  Visa-Waiver Countries (3 months)
  United Kingdom (6 months)
  Australia (deemed to hold resident status on arrival)

Visa waiver countries[edit]

Under the Immigration Act 2009[3] and the Immigration (Visa, Entry Permission, and Related Matters) Regulations 2010[4] passport holders of the following 60 jurisdictions may travel to New Zealand without obtaining a visa for up to 90 days.[5]

Holders of United Nations laissez-passer do not required visa.
Purpose of the visit for all visa waiver countries must not be medical consultation or treatment

Notes
  1. ^  United Kingdom citizens and other British passport holders who produce evidence of the right to reside permanently in the United Kingdom may travel to New Zealand without visa for 180 days.
  2. ^ A visa waiver does not apply to people traveling on alien's (non-citizen's) passports issued by these countries – Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania.
  3. ^ Only Greek passport holders whose passports were issued on and after 1 January 2006.
  4. ^ Portuguese passport holders must also have the right to live permanently in Portugal.
  5. ^ Residents of Hong Kong traveling on Hong Kong Special Administrative Region passport or British National (Overseas) passport.
  6. ^ Residents of Macau travelling on Macau Special Administrative Region passport.
  7. ^ Permanent residents, as demonstrated by a personal identity number, of Taiwan traveling on Taiwan passports.
  8. ^ Including nationals of the USA.

Other categories[edit]

Additionally, the visa waiver applies to the following categories:[45]

  • people granted a visa waiver by special direction.
  • members of a visiting force (including members of the civilian component of the visiting force) as defined in the Visiting Forces Act 2004 at the request or with consent of the Government of New Zealand and in the ordinary course of the person's duty or employment.
  • for periods of 28 days, crew or passengers on any ship carrying passengers (including cruise ship passengers) or cargo or both (in the ordinary course of business of the craft) between any foreign port and New Zealand.
  • for periods of 28 days, crew on any foreign ship authorised by the Minister of Transport to carry coastal cargo.
  • for periods of 7 days, beginning with the day on which the aircraft arrived in New Zealand, aircraft crew on any commercial aircraft flying between any other country and New Zealand.
  • members of, or any person associated with, any scientific programme or expedition under the auspices of a Contracting Party to the Antarctic Treaty within the meaning of the Antarctica Act 1960.
  • any other class of persons specified in the Immigration (Visa, Entry Permission, and Related Matters) Regulations 2010.

APEC Business Travel Card[edit]

Holders of passports issued by the following countries who possess an APEC Business Travel Card (ABTC) containing the "NZL" code on the reverse that it is valid for travel to New Zealand can enter visa-free for business trips for up to 90 days.[46]

ABTCs are issued to nationals of:[47]

Transit[edit]

New Zealand Visa

Eligible passengers who are transiting through a New Zealand airport for less than 24 hours, and not leaving the transit area of the airport, do not need a transit visa. Eligible passengers are:[48]

Cook Islands[edit]

Cook Islands entry stamp issued at Rarotonga International Airport

All visitors to Cook Islands, irrespective of nationality, are visa exempt for a maximum stay of 31 days. Visitors travelling for tourist purposes may extend their stay, for periods of 31 days, up to a maximum of 6 months.[50]

Niue[edit]

Niue entry stamp issued at Hanan International Airport

All visitors to Niue, irrespective of nationality, are visa exempt for a maximum stay of 30 days. Extension of stay are possible.[51]

Tokelau[edit]

All visitors must obtain a permit to enter Tokelau from the Tokelau Apia Liaison Office in Apia, at least 2 weeks prior to travel. Tokelau can only be reached by boat from Samoa and a permit from the Samoan Immigration Authorities is required to leave and re-enter Samoa.[52]

Statistics[edit]

New Zealand issued 262,033 general visitor visas in 2014/15 fiscal year. Top nationalities were:[53]

Applicant nationality Number of general visitor visas issued
 China 128,849[54]
 India 40,142
 Fiji 14,511
 Philippines 10,002
 Tonga 9,128
 Thailand 8,425
 Samoa 7,421
 Russia 3,994

Most visitors came from the following countries of residence:[55]

Unnamed[edit]

In the early years New Zealand was seen by Europeans as the most remote country on earth. For most Europeans New Zealand was an unappealing prospect, a strange and lonely land reached after 100 days on dangerous seas; its coasts were thought treacherous, its inhabitants bloodthirsty. Only exceptional reasons led people to set off for such a distant corner of the globe. Many of New Zealand’s early immigrants first spent time in Australia, and most of them were only temporary visitors in search of items to trade.

Among the earliest visitors were sealers, attracted by the promise of high-quality oil, and fur for hats (often sold in China in return for tea). As early as 1792, whalers came to the northern end of the country, also as temporary visitors. Also missionaries arrived in New Zealand. By 1839 the total non-Māori population was about 2,000.

Until 1839 there were only about 2,000 immigrants in New Zealand; by 1852 there were about 28,000. The decisive moment for this remarkable change was 1840. In that year the Treaty of Waitangi was signed. This established British authority in European eyes, and gave British immigrants legal rights as citizens. Most of the people who moved to New Zealand Company settlements were British.

From 1853 to 1870 the non-Māori population of New Zealand rose from just under 30,000 to over 250,000. As with the inflow of the 1840s, there were three main groups – assisted families coming directly from Britain; individuals from across the Tasman looking for a better life; and military settlers.[56]

1881-1914

Restrictions on immigration were first imposed in 1881. Until then, anyone who arrived in New Zealand had been able to remain in the country. The Chinese Immigrants Act 1881 was the first to restrict the entry of a specific group of people. The number of Chinese who could arrive on one ship was limited to one for every 10 tons of the vessel’s weight. A poll tax of £10 was also imposed on each Chinese person entering the country. Unlike the Chinese, most Indians were British subjects and free to enter New Zealand until the very end of the 19th century. From 1896, despite objections from the British government, New Zealand tried to pass more comprehensive legislation restricting the immigration not just of the Chinese but also of Indians and other Asians.

The 1899 act prohibited the entry of immigrants who were not of British or Irish parentage and who could not fill out an application form ‘in any European language’ – which in practice meant English.These rules were in place for the next 20 years. The fear of economic competition was one reason why the entry of Chinese, Indians and other ‘race aliens’ was restricted.

1914-1945

Under the War Regulations of 1916, during the First World War, no person over the age of 15 could land in New Zealand without a passport or other document establishing his or her nationality or identity. Under the Undesirable Immigrants Exclusion Act 1919, Germans and Austro-Hungarians were prohibited from entering without a licence issued by the attorney general. The act also gave power to the attorney general to prohibit the entry of any person not resident in New Zealand – including British subjects – who was disaffected or disloyal, or of such a character that his presence would be injurious to the peace, order and good government’ of New Zealand.

The Immigration Restriction Amendment Act 1920 was passed primarily to restrict possible Asian immigration, but Asians were not its only targets. It was also used to curb the entry of other non-British people, particularly southern Europeans such as Dalmatians and Italians.

The 1931 Immigration Restriction Amendment Act, passed during the Depression period of the 1930s, prevented aliens (as non-British immigrants were still known) from Europe entering New Zealand. The only exceptions were if they had guaranteed employment, a considerable amount of capital, or knowledge and skills.

1946-present

From 1961 only Australians had unrestricted entry to New Zealand. This was a long-standing right, established in 1840 when New Zealand became a British colony like Australia. Reciprocal travel arrangements, beginning in the 1920s, formalised this free movement from one country to the other. In 1973, the Trans-Tasman Travel Arrangement allowed Australian and New Zealand citizens to enter each other’s countries (to visit, live, work or remain indefinitely) without having to apply for a permit.

Under the 1961 Immigration Amendment Act, British and Irish immigrants, along with other non-New Zealand citizens (except Australians, who could enter freely) were required to have a permit before entering New Zealand. In practice, the permit was only a formality for Britons and Irish: they were issued with permits on arrival. Nevertheless, for the first time, the 1961 act put British and non-British people on the same footing when they sought to enter New Zealand. After the immigration policy review of 1974, British migrants, like all others, were required to obtain a permit before they left their homelands. The British and Irish were now on the same footing as the nationals of other countries.

In 40s-70s New Zealand has concluded visa-free agreements with countries of Western Europe.

Visa-free regime has been cancelled because of illegal immigration with Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, Tuvalu, Indonesia, Thailand, Zimbabwe, Samoa and Tonga.

As of 2017, under the Immigration Act 2009[57] and the Immigration (Visa, Entry Permission, and Related Matters) Regulations 2010[58] passport holders of the following 60 jurisdictions may travel to New Zealand without obtaining a visa for up to 90 days.[59]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Country information (visa section)". Timatic. International Air Transport Association (IATA) through Olympic Air. Retrieved 1 April 2017. 
  2. ^ Passport-free applications and label-less visas
  3. ^ Immigration Act 2009
  4. ^ Immigration (Visa, Entry Permission, and Related Matters) Regulations 2010 (SR 2010/241)
  5. ^ Immigration New Zealand Visa-Waiver Countries, Immigration New Zealand (INZ) - Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment
  6. ^ Exchange of Notes between New Zealand and France establishing Visa Abolition Agreement
  7. ^ Exchange of Notes between the Government of New Zealand and the Government of Sweden concerning the Mutual Abolition of Visas
  8. ^ Exchange of Notes between the Government of New Zealand and the Government of Switzerland constituting an Agreement concerning the Mutual Abolition of Visas.
  9. ^ Exchange of Notes between New Zealand and Switzerland (Applies also to Liechtenstein) concerning Mutual Abolition of Visas
  10. ^ Agreement between New Zealand and Denmark for the Abolition of Visas
  11. ^ Exchange of Notes constituting an Agreement between New Zealand and Netherlands concerning the Mutual Abolition of Visas
  12. ^ Exchange of Notes between New Zealand and Norway constituting an Agreement for the Mutual Abolition of Visas
  13. ^ Exchange of Notes constituting Agreement between Luxembourg and New Zealand for the Abolition of Visas
  14. ^ Agreement between New Zealand and Belgium concerning the Mutual Abolition of Visas
  15. ^ Exchange of Notes between the Government of New Zealand and the Government of Monaco concerning the Mutual Abolition of Visas
  16. ^ Exchange of Letters between the Government of New Zealand and the Government of the Republic of Italy constituting an Agreement concerning Visas
  17. ^ Exchange of Letters constituting an Agreement between the Government of New Zealand and the Royal Greek Government concerning Visas
  18. ^ Exchange of Letters constituting an Agreement between the Government of New Zealand and the Government of the Federal Republic of Germany concerning the Mutual Abolition of Visas
  19. ^ Exchange of Letters between the Government of New Zealand and the Government of Finland constituting an Agreement concerning the Mutual Abolition of Visas
  20. ^ Exchange of Letters constituting an Agreement between the Government of New Zealand and Government of Iceland concerning the Abolition of Visa Requirements
  21. ^ Immigration Regulations 1987
  22. ^ Immigration Regulations 1991 Amendment No. 2 1993
  23. ^ Immigration Amendment Regulations (No. 2) 1998
  24. ^ Immigration Amendment Regulations (No. 3) 1998
  25. ^ Immigration Amendment Regulations (No. 4) 1998
  26. ^ Immigration Amendment Regulations (No. 5) 1998
  27. ^ Immigration Amendment Regulations (No. 2) 1999
  28. ^ Immigration Amendment Regulations (No. 6) 1999
  29. ^ Immigration Amendment Regulations (No 2) 2000
  30. ^ Immigration Amendment Regulations (No 3) 2001
  31. ^ Immigration Amendment Regulations (No 2) 2002
  32. ^ Immigration Amendment Regulations 2005
  33. ^ Immigration Amendment Regulations (No 2) 2007
  34. ^ Immigration (Visa, Entry Permission, and RelatedВ Matters) Amendment RegulationsВ (NoВ 2)В 2013
  35. ^ Immigration (Visa, Entry Permission, and Related Matters) Amendment Regulations (No 2) 2014
  36. ^ Immigration (Visa, Entry Permission, and Related Matters) Amendment Regulations 2016
  37. ^ Exchange of Notes between the Government of New Zealand and the Government of the Kingdom of Tonga constituting an Agreement on the Waiver of Visas,
    Exchange of Letters between the Government of New Zealand and the Government of Fiji constituting an Agreement on the Waiver of Visas.
  38. ^ Immigration Amendment Regulations (No. 4) 1998
  39. ^ Was applied from 1 October 1996. Immigration Regulations 1991 Amendment No. 7 1996,
    Immigration Amendment Regulations (No 3) 2000.
  40. ^ Was applied from 1 November 1987. Immigration Regulations 1987,
    Immigration Amendment Regulations (No 3) 2000.
  41. ^ Was applied from 1 March 2000. Immigration Amendment Regulations (No. 6) 1999,
    Immigration Amendment Regulations 2003.
  42. ^ Exchange of Letters between the Government of New Zealand and the Government of Kiribati constituting an Agreement on the Waiver of Visas,
    Exchange of Letters between the Government of New Zealand and the Governemt of Nauru constituting an Agreement on the Waiver of Visas,
    Exchange of Letters between the Government of New Zealand and the Government of Tuvalu constituting an Agreement on the Waiver of Visas.
  43. ^ Immigration Amendment Regulations (No 4) 2003
  44. ^ Was applied from 1 October 1996. Immigration Regulations 1991 Amendment No. 7 1996, Immigration (Visa, Entry Permission, and Related Matters) Amendment Regulations 2016.
  45. ^ E2.1 People to whom a visa waiver applies
  46. ^ [1]
  47. ^ ABTC Summary
  48. ^ Transit
  49. ^ Transit visa country waiver list
  50. ^ [2]
  51. ^ [3]
  52. ^ [4]
  53. ^ Immigration New Zealand statistics - V1 - Visitor applications decided
  54. ^ Additionally 153,025 group visas were issued to Chinese nationals.
  55. ^ International Visitor Arrivals to New Zealand: December 2015 Page 11
  56. ^ http://www.teara.govt.nz/en
  57. ^ Immigration Act 2009
  58. ^ Immigration (Visa, Entry Permission, and Related Matters) Regulations 2010 (SR 2010/241)
  59. ^ Immigration New Zealand Visa-Waiver Countries, Immigration New Zealand (INZ) - Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment