History of veganism

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Fruitlands in 1915, an early vegan community in Harvard, Massachusetts

Veganism is the practice of abstaining from the use of animal products. One of the first recorded individuals following a vegan diet was Dr. William Lambe in 1806. Later individuals included John Frank Newton, a patient of Dr. Lambe, in 1811 and Percy Bysshe Shelley in 1813.[1]

In 1838, James Pierrepont Greaves opened Alcott House in Ham, London as a boarding school with pupils required to follow a vegetarian diet, understood as a vegan diet today. They used "vegetarian" to describe a 100% plant-based diet; Vegetarians do however eat other dairy products besides the meats. A vegan will only eat off of vegetation and no animal products. a [1] Supporters of Alcott House were aey group in the formation of the first Vegetarian Society in 1847.[1]

In 1843, Amos Bronson Alcott and Charles Lane established the short-lived vegan community Fruitlands in Harvard, Massachusetts.[2]

In 1944, Donald Watson coined the word "vegan" and founded the Vegan Society.[1]

Historians of Veganism[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d John Davis. "A History of Veganism from 1806" (PDF). International Vegetarian Union. 
  2. ^ "Fruitlands".